Are you old school, or new school?

 

When you turn on your computer, you expect to see if boot up into your operating system. That operating system may be Windows, Mac OS, Linux etc. and If you have a computer with no operating system, then you pretty much have a paperweight.

In order to start your computer, it needs some low level software known as the BIOS or UEFI to communicate with the hardware and to make sure it's all functioning properly and ready for the operating system to load. This software will do things like run a Power On Self Test (POST) to check the hardware and then run some sort of bootloader to access your hard drive to load your operating system.

 

This software is also responsible for storing things like the system time that is stored in the CMOS batter, keeping boot order of your drives, and storing low level drivers used by the computer to give it basic operational control over its hardware. You can also check things like your RAM capacity and hard drive configuration.

All motherboards will have a built-in BIOS (Basic Input Output System) or the newer UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface), and both of these are used as a software interface between an operating system and the platform firmware. If you have a newer computer it should come with a UEFI since using a BIOS is not really used anymore, but keep in mind that if you are working on an older computer, you will be accessing the BIOS rather than UEFI to check settings and change system configurations. As you can see below there is quite a difference in the look of a BIOS screen (top) and UEFI screen (bottom) with the UEFI screen looking much more modern. Most UEFI interfaces will also allow you to use the mouse where the older BIOS screens are menu driven (using the arrow keys and Enter button on the keyboard).

BIOS Screen

UEFI Screen

The BIOS has certain limitations compared to modern UEFI systems

  • It must be stored on a non-volatile ROM chip on the motherboard
  • It can only boot from drives of 2.1 TB or less
  • It must run in 16 bit processor mode
  • It only has 1,024KB of executable space
  • It is slower when trying to initializing multiple hardware device

UEFI has some substantial benefits over the BIOS

  • It uses the GPT partitioning scheme instead of MBR and larger hard drive sizes
  • Supports Secure Boot
  • It can run in 32-bit or 64-bit mode
  • It can be stored in flash memory on the motherboard, on a hard drive, or even on a network share.
  • Allows the computer to boot faster

For most people who are not super hardware geeks, the main thing you will notice is that it's much easier to use a UEFI system than one with a BIOS and if you are a graphical user interface (GUI) kind of person you will feel more at home being able to use your mouse and click your way through the settings.

To get to these settings, look for a message on the screen during startup that says press "x" to enter setup or configuration etc. It may be something like the delete or escape key, or maybe one of the F keys like F2. Your motherboard manual should tell you how to get into these settings or you can look up your motherboard online and see if you can find it.

Once you are in there, you can browse around and look at all the specific settings. I wouldn't recommend changing any of them unless you know what you are doing or if there is a real need to do so. In most cases when you exit the BIOS or UEFI, it will ask you if you want to save your changes, so if you did do something on accident simply say no to saving any changes.

Your computer will either have a BIOS or UEFI and there is no upgrading if you are stuck with a BIOS without upgrading your motherboard which will most likely involve upgrading other components such as RAM to go along with it.

Pin It

Join Us On FaceBook

We Recommend:



Join Us On Twitter

Get insights into the computer industry and regular updates on our site. Click Here

OCT Youtube Channel

New tech tip videos posted on a regular basis. Subscribe today! Click Here

Sponsored

LATEST VIDEOS

Cut Yourself Out a Slice of Data As you probably know...

Mount an ISO Image File in a VirtualBox VM Oracle Vi...

Find Your Wireless Password With Ease Many of us have...

3 Ways to Rename your Computer When you install Windo...

Create a Windows iSCSI Storage Server Microsoft Windo...

Learn about Windows 10 Safe Mode and recovery options ...

RECENT TIPS

Are you old school, or new school?   When...

Is it time to move to the cloud?   Have y...

Time For Some Windows 10 Spring Cleaning!  ...

Restore Access to Your Admin Shares!   Th...

Is your host up to speed? Finding a reliable ...

Do you feel safe surfing the Internet?   ...

NEWS

WPA2 May Not Be So Secure After All With WPA2 being the...

WPA3 Wireless Security is Coming to Save Us! Wi-Fi is a...

Will Net Neutrality Save or Destroy the Internet? Back ...

Who Will be the Future King of the Processor? When it c...

Microsoft Holds off on its Next Windows 10 Update Thanks...

YouTube taking money away from the little guys I’m sure...